A Statement From Pursuit

11 Jun

A Statement From Pursuit

We’ve taken the time to pause, listen, look inward, and reflect. We know change starts at the individual level, and we believe we can be agents of that change. At Pursuit, we know we can and will do better. We’ve always had a longstanding commitment to hire and engage with a diverse group of individuals, but we believe it is our duty to amplify our efforts and hold ourselves and the communities we represent accountable. 

Here are some of the things we’re vowing to do: 

LISTENING, READING, LEARNING

We at Pursuit recognize that this is a moment to educate ourselves. To aid in that, we’ve created a list of articles, podcasts, films and books that focus on policies that enable systemic racism, and encourage you to watch, listen and read along with us. We’re starting with The Color of Law by Richard Rothstein. (Need a copy? Get in touch.)

We’ll host quarterly town hall gatherings for our employees, inviting scholars, real estate professionals, and race-relation experts to speak on current Black issues. 

In addition, we’ll schedule continuing education classes for all staff, covering topics like Equal Housing in advertising. If you’d like to attend, reach out.

We intend to push ourselves and our colleagues to better understand the systemic oppression against Black and all IPOC, especially here in New York City.

PARTICIPATION

We support our employees’ right to vote. As always, staff will be granted paid leave from the office to exercise that right on Election Day. To deconstruct an inherently racist system, we have to start with local, state, and national representational changes.

ACTION

We’ll divert funds from big box corporations and, instead, source our office supplies and presentation materials from New York Black-owned businesses, wherever possible.

Though we’re proud of our already diverse in-house staff, we know we can do better. We vow to hire more BIPOC team members and freelancers and foster those new relationships into potential future full-time hires.  

CONTRIBUTION

We’re committed to financially matching, dollar-for-dollar, our employees’ donations to BIPOC organizations.

We know that these are small acts, but we believe that small acts can create a world of change. 

Ross + Rosemary

RESOURCES: 

READ: 

  1. The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America
  2. Race for Profit: How Banks and the Real Estate Industry Undermined Black Homeownership (Justice, Power, and Politics)
  3. Race + Real Estate(Transgressing Boundaries: Studies in Black Politics and Black Communities) 
  4. Race + Real Estate – Conflict, and cooperation in Harlem 
  5. Family Properties – How the Struggle Over Race and Real Estate Transformed Chicago and Urban America
  6. American Apartheid: Segregation and the Making of the Underclass
  7. $2.00 a Day: Living on Almost Nothing in America 
  8. How to Kill a City: Gentrification, Inequality, and the Fight for the Neighborhood
  9. Dimensions of Racism in Advertising: From Slavery to the Twenty-First Century
  10. Segregation by Design: Local Politics and Inequality in American Cities
  11. Levittown: Two Families, One Tycoon, And The Fight For Civil Rights In America’s Legendary Suburb

ARTICLES:

  1. The Case for Reparations
  2. Separated by Design: Why Affordable Housing Is Built in Areas With High Crime, Few Jobs and Struggling Schools
  3. Staggering Loss of Black Wealth Due to Subprime Scandal Continues 
  4. The sordid history of housing discrimination in America
  5. How Real Estate Segregated America

LISTEN: 

  1. Berkeley Talks: How the real estate industry undermined black homeownership
  2. Unlocking Us with Brene Brown: Brene with Ibrham X. Kendi on How to Be an Antiracist
  3. An Evening with author, Richard Rothstein
  4. A ‘Forgotten History’ Of How The U.S. Government Segregated
  5. Unfair housing: Why Racism and real estate are so hard to untangle
  6. Bowery Boys: Building Stuyvestant Town: A Mid-Century Controversy
  7. Code Switch: Location Location Location
  8. The Red Line: Racial Disparities in Lending

WATCH:

  1. The Last Black Man in San Francisco
  2. Racism has a cost for everyone
  3. America Divided: A House Divided
  4. The Disturbing History of the Suburbs | Adam Ruins Everything (6 minutes)
  5. Why Cities are Still So Segregated
  6. Brick By Brick: A Civil Rights Story
  7. The Pruitt-Igoe Myth

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